Teaching Control Technologies to younger children

These resources are designed to be used by teacher trainers or for teacher CPD courses. We have tried and tested all of the Taccle workshops with teachers across Europe as part of the Taccle projects.

Here we share our aims, objectives, and resources. You are free to use and repurpose the materials under the cc license at the bottom of the site.

 

Robotics / control technology for younger children

At the end of the session, teachers will be able to:

 

Use cubelets to solve simple programming problems

Programme a Beebot and demonstrate some examples of how the can use it in the classroom

List the advantages and disadvantages of each, their value for money and their applicability to the age range.

Resources

Control Technologies for Younger Children

 

 

 

Implementing The Welsh Digital Competence Framework in the Foundation Phase

Cylchoed Meithrin

What the (Welsh) Digital Competence Framework means for Methrin (Foundation Phase)

 

Introduction

4 strands 

  • Citizenship
  • Interacting and collaborating
  • Producing
  • Data and computational thinking

 

4 main points 

  1. Neither teachers nor children have to become experts in computer programming overnight, it does not mean that the children will be stuck looking at tablets or computer screens more often than they do now and it doesn’t need lots of money spent on technology.

 

  1. Just because a lesson uses technology does NOT mean it is an ICT/DCF lesson. Conversely, most of the activities that contribute directly to delivering the DCF at this age can be delivered without technology

 

  1. Less emphasis on Schemes of Work, more emphasis on integration across curriculum and thematic approach

 

  1. Many of the activities you do already can be enhanced or adapted to deliver DCF.  Remember, all the Meithrin competences are preceded by “…with increasing independence”. You are just setting the foundations for what will be developed further in Derbyn, Dosbarth Un / Dau

 

Suggested CPD activities

20 minutes on trying out some ‘unplugged’ activities, including playground games, which develop a range of digital competences and require  ‘homemade’ kit

 

Unplugged activity DCF strand Sub-strand Competence
Coding cards

 

Data and Computational Thinking Problem solving and modelling

 

Complete patterns and sequences

 

Emoticon cards Citizenship Online behaviour and cyberbullying Identify emotions of others on a range of digital software, e.g. talk about feelings and begin to recognise emotions;

 

Human robots

 

Data and Computational Thinking Problem solving and modelling

 

Follow a simple sequence of instructions

 

1 and 2 variable sorting Data and Computational Thinking Data and information literacy

 

recognise that there are different types of data, e.g. sort and/or match objects/photographs/symbols

 

Sticks and stones

 

Data and Computational Thinking Data and information literacy

 

sort familiar objects using set criteria.

 

 

 

15 mins playing with a range of kit e.g. different robots and other non-screen user interfaces so that they can make an informed choice if they are thinking of buying anything

 

Activity DCF strand Sub strand Competence

 

Recognising card / wooden pathways

 

Data and Computational Thinking Problem solving and modelling

 

Complete patterns and sequences

 

Beebot cards and pockets Data and Computational Thinking Problem solving and modelling

 

Follow a simple sequence of instructions

Create one step instructions and identify the next step

 

Dash and Dot – gathering snow sheep

 

Data and Computational Thinking Problem solving and modelling

 

Follow a process making simple adjustments when needed

 

Cozmo Citizenship

 

Identity, image and reputation

 

Identify emotions of others on a range of digital software, e.g. talk about feelings and begin to recognise emotions

 

 

 

 

15 mins playing with some creative apps that develop digital competence and really work well with 3-4 yr olds

 

 

Activity DCF strand Sub strand Competence

 

Quiver Producing Planning, sourcing and searching

 

Explore and use different multimedia components in order to capture and use text, image, sound, animation and video.

 

Adding sound to emoticons Producing Creating Explore and use different multimedia components in order to capture and use text, image, sound, animation and video.

 

Osmo Producing Planning, sourcing and searching

 

Navigate through a piece of software using an internal menu to find desired item.

 

QR Christmas book Producing Creating

 

Explore and use different multimedia components in order to capture and use text, image, sound, animation and video.

 

Chatterpix Producing Evaluating and improving

 

Describe in response to questions some of what has been done in the task, e.g. add comments using recording feature in software.

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction to Coding and Programming in Primary Schools 

These resources are designed to be used by teacher trainers or for teacher CPD courses. We have tried and tested all of the Taccle workshops with teachers across Europe as part of the Taccle projects.

Here we share our aims, objectives, and resources. You are free to use and repurpose the materials under the cc license at the bottom of the site.

course for Foundation Phase and KS2 teachers

Aims of the workshop

  • To introduce teachers to some of the basic concepts they will have to teach to deliver the new curriculum
  • To provide ideas, materials and activities they can use in the classroom.
  • To reassure teachers that they CAN do this!

 

Workshop Objectives

At the end of the workshop teachers will be able to:

  • Explain any unfamiliar terminology in the computing curriculum in a way that is appropriate for the age they teach.
  • List some key principles for teaching coding /control technologies to children.
  • Discuss some alternative schemes of work and examine issues such as progression, differentiation, assessment.
  • Recognise how things that they do already can be integrated or adapted and used to deliver the computing curriculum.
  • Implement at least 3 entry – level lessons for either Foundation or KS2 on each of the following topics: Logical thinking, Understanding Algorithms, Creating and Debugging Programmes, Controlling Things.
  • List some of the basic equipment they will need or would be useful.
  • Explore and evaluate a range of software.
  • Learn how to use a Makey Makey and use simple robots.

 

Target group

Primary teachers who have little or no experience of coding and programming but who will be delivering the new Computing curriculum.

 

Format

The course will be hands-on and workshop based. There will be no input session longer than 10 minutes and teachers will be guided through the same experiential processes that they can adapt for working with children in their own classroom.  No prior knowledge of programming is necessary and the level of computer literacy required is no more than is required to teach the current ICT curriculum in primary schools to KS2.

 

Resources (click below, redirects to Taccle3 website)

An Introduction to Coding for Younger Children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting started with a Code Club!

A training plan written by Jen Hughes for Taccle 4 CPD

These resources are designed to be used by teacher trainers or for teacher CPD courses. We have tried and tested all of the Taccle workshops with teachers across Europe as part of the Taccle projects.

Here we share our aims, objectives, and resources. You are free to use and repurpose the materials under the cc license at the bottom of the site.

Target audience:

  • New or potential Code Club leaders (Primary age)
  • Managers of organisations organising code clubs

Aims:

To equip potential code club leaders with the skills and knowledge they will need to establish and run a coding club for primary school age children.

Objectives:

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe different models of coding clubs and different rational underpinning their operation
  • Discuss the equipment, materials, resources, staffing and premises requirements for a coding club.
  • Calculate the costs of running a coding club, prepare a list of capital and recurring expenditure and potential income.
  • List the legal and good practice requirements including DBS, insurance, safety, safeguarding and data security, AUP etc
  • Explain how achievements in a coding club can be recognised and rewarded
  • Describe different pedagogical approaches to helping children learn to code
  • Recognise and respond to the needs of children across the ability range
  • Say where they can get further help and support.

Outline programme:

Day 1: Getting started

Session 1.  Why coding clubs?

  • What is a coding club and why do we need them?
  • How did it all start?
  • Types of coding clubs – e.g school based, community or voluntary organisation based, private or stand- alone clubs
  • Frequency and duration of activities – weekly meetings, code camps, participation in local, national or international events
  • Target audience – inclusive, selective, open

Session 2: Money

  • Funding – what does it cost? Expenditure and Income
  • Session Premises – space, connectivity, internet and network access
  • Staffing – who? (teachers, volunteers, parents etc) expertise, different roles
  • Resources – IT equipment, other materials, BYOD
  • Marketing and advertising
  • Pricing models

Session 3: Legal requirements and good practice

  • Insurance
  • Legal issues
  • Safety, safeguarding, data security, AUP
  • Sharing equipment

Session 4:  Accreditation and recognition

  • Open Badge schemes for children and young people
  • Accredited training for staff

Day 2:  Delivering Content

Session 1: Types of programme

  • Hobby based vs complementary vs supplementary curriculum
  • Links to Computing /ICT curriculum /DCF
  • Working in tandem with schools /ICT co-ordinator /class teachers

Session 2: Programme delivery

  • Computing unplugged
  • Tangible User Interfaces
  • Robots
  • Graphic programme environments
  • Coding languages

Session 3:  Inclusivity and differentiation

  • Provision for less able children, more able and talented children and the geeks!

Session 4:  Support and training

  • Sources of help and advice
  • Training opportunities
  • National and local initiatives
  • Networks

Duration
The course could run over 2 days (9.30 – 3.30) which can be run as a block, as stand-alone days, 4x morning only or over 4/5 evenings.

Materials cost
All equipment and material will be provided but participants are encouraged to bring their own devices if they would prefer digital copies.

Format
The training will be based mainly on groupwork using case studies, mini-projects, role play and other interactive methods.